Jan 17

The Poetry of Politics

If our home is still zoned for Partin in 2014, my son could just as easily walk, bike, or swim to school!

Last night I attended a meeting regarding plans for rezoning Seminole County elementary schools. Indeed, it seemed there were as many proposed plans as committee members circled together inside the Winter Springs High School library.

Somewhere between my third and fourth Ghiradelli chocolate square, fortuitously strewn across our community table in the back, I heard the leaders agree to whittle down to five plans as a goal. And by the time I found the source of the flamingo-pink lemonade observers were holding, I had already gained a sweet appreciation for both the complexity of the problem and the impassioned individuals striving to solve it.

Sharing the precious scavenged provisions with my eleven-year-old daughter (who hadn’t had dinner either as we had raced from a dentist appointment), I realized something important about myself. You’ve heard, I’m a lover, not a fighter? Well, I’m a poet, not a politician. Now I know.

http://www.nps.gov/inde/independence-hall-1.htm

The inspiring Rising Sun Chair at Independence Hall in Boston

As I watched the panoply of the technical proceedings unfold, I thought of George Washington’s famous chair at Independence Hall. I had seen it up close in Boston when I was pregnant with Cassidy. Near the end of the Constitutional Convention’s historic debates in 1787, Benjamin Franklin had made his immortalized observation:

I have, he said to his founding friends, often and often, in the course of the session, and the vicissitudes of my hopes and fears as to its issue, looked at that behind the President, without being able to tell whether it was rising or setting; but now at length, I have the happiness to know, that it is a rising, and not a setting sun.

What a memorable metaphor. Maybe poetry has a place in politics after all. Before rhetoric took on a negative connotation for being used without conviction, the graceful use of words was actually part of the process. Watching C-SPAN today, I’m not feeling the love of language, or anything else for that matter.

But last night was different. Of the many PTA moms, principals, school board members, public servants and other impassioned volunteers whom I witnessed, none lacked for sincerity or commitment. I tip my half-full styrofoam cup to them all.

Returning home, inspired by the evening’s information and sugar, I did the only thing I could think to do. I wrote. Below is what came out: sixteen haiku poems, one for each of the villages within our diverse yet richly woven community of Live Oak Reserve here in Oviedo. Politics or poetry? Maybe they can still co-exist.

16 REZONING HAIKUS

Seminole rezone

Redistribute don’t divide

Live Oak Reserve homes

Sixteen villages

Standing together as one

Supporting Partin

One community

Defined by geography

Involved at Partin

Think transportation

Model green choices for them

Let Live Oak kids walk

Live Oak Reserve is

A walking community

Don’t take that away

The law appears clear

Proximity is foremost

Factor in rezone

Follow the statute

Strive to maximize locals

Minimize buses

Transportation law

Reasonable distance test

Live Oak all within

Spend increased taxes

On better education

Not gas for buses

Support childhood health

Not with empty words but votes

That reward walkers

We teach save the world

This choice must be consistent

Cut carbon footprint

Never on big streets

By foot and bike together

Live Oak kids go home

Parent involvement

Naturally higher when close

Made harder when far

Diverse families joined

Each working hard to live here

Growing with Partin

Live Oak Reserve: sixteen branches of one tree. Our goal: to stay together in the Partin Elementary school zone.

Live Oak Reserve: sixteen branches of one tree. Our goal: to stay together in the Partin Elementary school zone.

These sixteen branches

Filled with children as green leaves

Cherished every one

Branches of one tree

No matter how divided

Cannot thrive apart

Visit Live Oak Reserve HOA for current news on “One Community. One School.”
http://liveoakreservehoa.us/

3
comments

3 comments!!!

  1. Lisa Medla says:

    Tracey –
    Your poetry brought me to tears with its creativity and poignancy. As individuals, parents and active community members we strive for what is optimal for our soul, family, neighborhood, community, town, state, nation and world. We build from within and continually expand givng forth with richer spirit, energy and value. And thanks to the hard work of many individuals who have tirelessly reviewed these plans and attended long meetings, there are ways to maximize our resources, improve the FRL ratios and maintain the essential community fabric. We will continue to lobby for these options and pray that common sense prevails at the decision making level.
    Thank you for sharing. Lisa

    • Tracey Jane says:

      Thanks for kind response, Lisa. Emotions are running high for so many with this issue. Honestly, I felt a bit helpless at the meeting, and I think the idea of writing these gave me something positive on which to focus. Whatever the outcome, I’m so proud to be part of this amazing, passionate and engaged community of people.

  2. […] desire to do something, and to do it quickly, before the plans were finalized and set in stone. Sixteen haiku poems and a theme song poured out. My 11-year-old daughter helped me turn the song into a music video, […]

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